Artist Description

Umqhele: The crowning of black identity

My aim is to explore and determine how the discourse of post colonialism inform the relationship between the black women in and their afro textured hair. I chose to explore how black hair is represented throughout various spaces in history, the notions of beauty by western ideology, black hair as, or part of, pop culture today and the generalized representations and identity for black woman This practice centres itself on black female subjectivity, black beauty, and often uses hair as an apparatus to identify facets of womanhood. Using both female and male gender I chose to tackle issues of marital status, age, wealth, and rank on the social hierarchy within a community or tribe. Historically, hair has always been a social activity, as it still is today, salon spaces are used as an opportunity for women to socialize and exchange stories and life experiences.

Hair becomes the foreground signifier of these complex body politics because it introduced cultural practices such as straightening hair alongside skin bleaching which has long become practiced rituals in black culture. Outward markers such as hairstyles become the first attribute to catch the eye when you meet someone, not because it suggests attractive or unattractiveness but because it also conveys social, political and cultural meaning. This also provides a visual cue regarding how people identify themselves and assert their identity.

Woza Sisi Ed. 1/2

Cyanotype Photography by Nonkululeko Sibande
Materials used
cyanotype on cotton rag paper, unframed
Size
W:55cm x H:76cm x D:01cm (paper size, unframed)
Ltd Edition of 2, signed

Cape Town collection can be arranged
R5 000 incl VAT 
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  • Artist Description
    • Artist Description

      Umqhele: The crowning of black identity

      My aim is to explore and determine how the discourse of post colonialism inform the relationship between the black women in and their afro textured hair. I chose to explore how black hair is represented throughout various spaces in history, the notions of beauty by western ideology, black hair as, or part of, pop culture today and the generalized representations and identity for black woman This practice centres itself on black female subjectivity, black beauty, and often uses hair as an apparatus to identify facets of womanhood. Using both female and male gender I chose to tackle issues of marital status, age, wealth, and rank on the social hierarchy within a community or tribe. Historically, hair has always been a social activity, as it still is today, salon spaces are used as an opportunity for women to socialize and exchange stories and life experiences.

      Hair becomes the foreground signifier of these complex body politics because it introduced cultural practices such as straightening hair alongside skin bleaching which has long become practiced rituals in black culture. Outward markers such as hairstyles become the first attribute to catch the eye when you meet someone, not because it suggests attractive or unattractiveness but because it also conveys social, political and cultural meaning. This also provides a visual cue regarding how people identify themselves and assert their identity.

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    • Shipping to  

      Artwork will be rolled in acid-free tissue paper and shipped in a sturdy mailing tube.

      Packaging and shipping to door: R258.87

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