• Monique Day-Wilde

    Monique Day-Wilde
    • Artist Statement
      • A visual expression of my own quiet experiences the work of each day usually begins with a walk. Immersed in my surroundings I explore the treasures and details of nature often collecting found objects, providing a tangible link to the landscape in which I live. I observe the colours, lines, textures, shapes and patterns of the environment, drawing on them constantly in my creative process.
        My process usually begins with monotypes: I use physical specimens of different plants (mostly fynbos), seaweed and other natural finds to create prints on various papers including rice paper and teabags. Led by the materials at hand I use a variety of additional techniques like drawing, stitching, collage, assemblage and painting (often with wax), creating an intimate response to my surrounds.
    • Biography


      • Artist Monique Day-Wilde lives in Pringle Bay. During the course of her career she has lectured in Bloemfontein and Johannesburg, and completed many commissions, designed tapestries for the ‘Fibre Graphics’ exhibition at the SA Association of arts in Pretoria, and taken part in a number of group exhibitions over the years. The winner of the Art.b book arts competition in 2014, she was also included in the new ‘Collectors Guide to Art and Artists in South Africa’ published by The South African Institute of Artists and Graphic Designers.  The artist has been selected as a finalist in The Vuleka Art Competition over a number of years (2nd place in 2016, top 5 in 2018), been placed as a finalist in the Tollman Bouchard Finlayson Tondo competition for the last five years, and was a finalist for the StateoftheART Gallery Award 2019.

        Monique has work in private collections in the United Kingdom, Netherlands, France, USA, Canada and South Africa.


        Selected Exhibitions:


        2019

        StateoftheART Gallery Award Finalists Exhibition, Cape Town
        Living Coral: – with the FACT group (Fibre Artists Cape Town), Constantia, Cape Town
        Botanica: – art.b, Bellville
        Shades and Tones: – Art of thread, Hermanus Fynarts 2019
        Tiny Treasures: art.b, Bellville
        Fynbos and Fantasies: Pringle Bay

        2018


        Fynbos and Fantasies: Pringle Bay
        Call of the Wild: Bright Street Gallery, Somerset West
        #Paper:, Art.b Bellville
        Ten x 10: Small Print exhibition, Rosendal Gallery, Cape Town
        Interwoven: – with the FACT group (Fibre Artists Cape Town), Constantia, Cape Town
        The Grand: Group exhibition at Rust en Vrede, Durbanville
        Flight: Group exhibition of printmaking, Art.b, Bellville
        A thread runs through it: – Collaborative Relationships’ (two works) – part of Hermanus Fynarts
        Tiny Treasures:  Art.b, Bellville

        2017
        Vuleka Finalists: group exhibition, Art.b
        Vice Versa: Art.b
        Art of Threads: – part of Hermanus Fynarts
        Tiny Treasures: Art.b
        Visual Requiem for Judith Mason: traveling exhibition – Móinéir and Mok Galleries

        2016                    
        Tiny Treasures: Members exhibition, Art.b. Belville
        Art of Threads – part of Hermanus Fynarts
        Playground: Group exhibition at Moor Gallery in Franschoek
        Converse: group exhibition Móinéir Gallery in Pringle Bay

        2015                     
        Tiny Treasures: Members exhibition, Art.b. Belville

        2014                     
         Tiny Treasures: Members exhibition, Art.b. Belville
        Book Arts competition, Art.b, Belville (winner) group exhibition

        2013
        Miniatures: group exhibition Rust-en-Vreede gallery, Durbanville

    • Interview
      • Which new trends or South African artists do you find inspiring at the moment?
        I have quite an eclectic taste and don’t really follow trends.  There are many exceptionally talented artists in South Africa but I’m always inspired by Shany van den Berg, especially her mixed media work and I’m fascinated by the wonderful light in the paintings of Jeannie Kinsler.

        Which South African deceased artist do you most admire and why?
        I most admire the work of Judith Mason – the subtleties in her drawings are jaw dropping. I’m always excited to see work by Frans Oerder too, as he was a friend of my grandfather’s so there is a personal connection.  Neil Rogers is also a favourite, his beautifully considered paintings shine.

        If you could only have one piece of art in your life, what would it be?
        Oh dear, one can never have too many paintings!  I’d Possibly ‘Judith’ by Gustav Klimt – I’ve seen the painting close up and the detail is extraordinary.

        How did you get started? Did you always want to be an artist?

        I have always created in one way or another and sold my first painting at five and the bug bit then I think!

        What are some of the key themes you explore in your work?

        I include fynbos in most of my monotypes and painted collages and think of it as a type of ‘record keeping’. I think that one’s immediate environment plays a huge part in the art one makes.  I am struck by how much of my personal symbolism is very relevant to our collective culture.  Land plays an important part in the South African narrative – our interaction with our environment, both natural and man-made, is complex, becoming increasingly more complicated as we exploit the natural world for our perceived well-being.  In my work I concentrate on the disappearing beauty and fragility of the landscape – I am intrigued by the idea of using part of the physical landscape in a painting by starting with collaged monoprints.

        What should people know about your art that they can’t tell from looking at it?
        It’s not necessarily apparent that I use physical plant and other found object specimens to create my monotypes.

        Tell us more about your creative process.

        The work of each day usually begins with a walk. Immersed in my surroundings I explore the treasures and details of nature often collecting found objects, providing a tangible link to the landscape in which I live. I observe the colours, lines, textures, shapes and patterns of the environment, drawing on them constantly in my creative process. This usually begins with monotypes: I use physical specimens of different plants (mostly fynbos), seaweed and other natural finds to create prints on various papers including rice paper and teabags. Led by the materials at hand I use a variety of additional techniques like drawing, stitching, collage, assemblage and painting (often with wax), creating an intimate response to my surrounds.

        What drives you as an artist?
        I’m not sure I know how not to be an artist.  I take great pleasure in being able to create things that could enhance someone’s life.

        Do you have a favourite or most meaningful work?

        It’s hard to say – I think that it’s usually the work I’m busy on.

        What is your greatest achievement as an artist to date?

        I think taking the plunge into fine art - to be able to hang my work alongside other artists and having people connect with it in some way is a big achievement.

        What are your aspirations for the future?

        I feel I am only beginning to explore my process and would like to expand and hone my ideas.  I’m always working on new things and open to new opportunities.
  • Lifelines II - Handmade Print by Monique Day-Wilde MONIQUE DAY-WILDE
    Lifelines II
    Handmade Print / 86 x 62 cm
    $560
  • Lifelines I - Handmade Print by Monique Day-Wilde MONIQUE DAY-WILDE
    Lifelines I
    Handmade Print / 86 x 62 cm
    $560
  • Lifelines III - Handmade Print by Monique Day-Wilde MONIQUE DAY-WILDE
    Lifelines III
    Handmade Print / 86 x 62 cm
    $560